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Fibromyalgia and the relationship with mental health

Although characterised by widespread pain and other physical symptoms like headaches, tender point pain, irritable bowel syndrome and fatigue, sadly fibromyalgia is not just a physical pain disorder.

Fibromyalgia sufferers deal with a range of physical and emotional symptoms, and problems with mental clarity are common, as well as links to anxiety and depression. A recent report found that people who experience fibromyalgia are three times more likely to suffer from depression than the rest of the population. One of the reasons for this may be that fibromyalgia is still often seen as an “invisible disability”, and it is common for those who suffer from it to not have their symptoms believed.

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterised by widespread musculoskeletal pain, accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Furthermore, anxiety, PTSD, neurotic tendencies, and higher levels of stress and anger are also commonplace for those diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

While there is no cure for fibromyalgia, a variety of medications can help control symptoms. Doctors also recommend getting regular exercise and a Harvard Medical School study discovered that women who engaged in strength training, aerobic activity, and flexibility training reported feeling better physically and mentally after four months.

From holistic methods to sleep and relaxation, there are a number of different ways fibromyalgia sufferers can help improve their mental health, such as:

  • Meditation
  • Ample sleep and relaxation
  • Gentle exercise can boost your mood
  • Taking time out for yourself
  • Talking to someone
  • Boosting your mood with food

Hosted by the Mental Health Foundation, Mental Health Awareness Week 2021, which takes place between 10-16 May, focuses on nature and the positive relationship between nature and supporting good mental health. More than half of UK adults say that being close to nature improved their mental health, 4 in 10 people say that it made them feel less worried or anxious, and almost 2/3 of people said that being close to nature meant that they experienced positive emotions.

Find the time to go outside in a park or near a lake or river. Or if it is difficult to get out, look at wildlife from your window or grow a plant in your house and try to connect to nature.

So whether you incorporate some gentle exercise into your daily routine, or get in contact with your GP for help – just a few simple changes can help to boost your mental health and make a big difference to your life.

If you are suffering from fibromyalgia as a result of an injury or accident that was not your fault, get in touch with Brian Barr Solicitors to see if you’re eligible to claim compensation. Call us today on 0161 737 9248 or visit our website to find out more.

 

 

 

 

We do not endorse any research, studies or sources mentioned within our blogs and comments. The blog is for information purposes only as we are not medical professionals. We do not endorse any medical advice provided, and would strongly recommend anyone seeking medical advice to contact their local healthcare provider before any changes to treatment and/or management of your condition is undertaken.

 

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